Snowfall and Fire Danger

Sydney1-02-24-2013After experiencing the amount of snowfall we had last weekend it is hard to think about another dry summer and the possible forest fires it might bring!  However, on February 26th, only 2 days after our big snow storm, Channel 9 News aired a report telling us that the state’s forest service said it was not enough to eliminate concerns about fire dangers this summer.  As of Tuesday, our state-wide snowpack is only about 76% of average and yet this time last year it was about 86%, and we all know how bad the fires were in 2012!  To see the entire video, go to 9 News at http://www.9news.com/rss/story.aspx?storyid=319751.

Snowpack is the accumulation of snow in the mountains during the winter.  The amount of water in our snowpack directly relates to what goes into our streams and ponds during the late spring and early summer.  Melting snowpack accounts for 80% of our total surface water and the snowpack in Colorado usually reaches its highest level around April 1st.  Therefore, we need to wish for a lot more snow during the month of March!  According to the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, this is the 5th year Colorado has had below-average snowpack and this is the 3rd straight year of a drought cycle.  To read more, go to the Colorado Climate Center at http://ccc.atmos.colostate.edu/droughtqanda.php.

Be sure to make plans and attend the next Elk Creek Highlands / Meadows Property Owners Association meeting at 7 PM, Wednesday, March 6th, in the Association Building at 86 Elk Creek Drive, Bailey.  Our guest speaker will be Joe Burgett, Assistant Fire Chief, who will present the READY-SET-GO procedures for evacuation of the area if needed.  He will also give an update on Department organization, burn bans and burn permits.

The above picture was submitted by Gregg and Kathy Pearson – Sydney loves the snow!  To see more pictures go to the Winter page under the Photo Gallery menu option.  More snow storm pictures wanted!  Please send to CUNColorado@aol.com.

Moose and Mountain Lions

Joyce Deming and Paul Ellis both sent me emails they had received from dowinsider.wildlife@state.co.us that we all thought would be interesting to our community and would like to share with you.  These emails are sent periodically from The Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission.

The first article is titled “South Park moose to be collared for study,” sent Tuesday, February 19, 2013 10:29 am.

Colorado Parks & Wildlife - MooseGPS collars will be placed on 5 South Park cow moose to be able to track their movements and to learn more about them.  Moose can weigh up to 1,100 pounds, can be 6 feet tall at the shoulder, and 9.5 feet long, making them the largest of the deer family.  They have poor vision, however their excellent hearing and sense of smell more than make up for it.  Moose can run up to 50 mph and are excellent swimmers.  Moose graze on grasses, forbs, underwater vegetation, bushes, and willows.  Moose are hard to spot as they have dark hides, do not roam in herds, and can easily hide in the willows and trees.  To read the whole article, click on the title underlined and listed above.

The second article is titled “Mountain lions may be visiting your neighborhood without you even knowing it,” sent Tuesday, February 19, 2013 8:25 am.

Mountain lions do not hibernate, are mostColorado Parks & Wildlife - Mountain Lion active at night, hunt for deer and small mammals, and can roam more than 20 miles to find food or mates.  When a deer is killed, part of the meat is eaten and the rest is covered up with dirt or leaves until the lion returns to eat more.  Lions will remain in the area until all the meat is eaten or spoiled which could take up to a week during the colder months.  It is illegal to feed deer as it brings them into a neighborhood, attracting mountain lions and puts everyone at risk.  In order to keep your pets safe, you should avoid leaving them out alone especially during the hours between sunset and sunrise.  If you do see a mountain lion, stay calm, stand upright and try to appear larger by raising your arms and holding your jacket open wide, talk loudly and back away slowly.  Do not approach a mountain lion, do not turn your back, and do not run.  To read the whole article, click on the title underlined and listed above.

March 2013 Association Meeting

NewsThe Elk Creek Highlands / Meadows Property Owners Association will meet at 7 PM, Wednesday, March 6th, in the Association Building at 86 Elk Creek Drive, Bailey.

Joe Burgett, Assistant Fire Chief, will present the READY-SET-GO procedures for evacuation of the area if needed.  He will also give an update on Department organization, burn bans and burn permits.

Regular monthly reports will be given along with planning for future events.

Board of Directors for 2013 are Danny Colligan, President, Brad Burk, Vice-President, Ken Perdew, Secretary/Treasurer.  Other members, Jeff DeBerry and Paul Ellis.  Tracie Schaefer will serve as an alternate.

For additional information, call Ken Perdew at 303-838-7768.

Every Saturday in Bailey!

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We now have cheese fondue, served with baguette available in addition to our sAspen Peak Cellars logoalamis, cheeses & dips.

60750 US Hwy 285 Bailey, CO 80421                       (Next to The Rustic Station Restaurant)